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04 March 2015

Teacher trainers from the 15 divisions of the Department of Education National Capital Region underwent a three-day seminar-workshop that improved their skills in teaching through problem under the Science Teacher Academy for the Regions (STAR) program of DOST-SEI.

Continuing its bid to raise the bar of excellence in teaching elementary mathematics, the Department of Science and Technology – Science Education Institute (DOST-SEI) completed training 48 Metro Manila teacher trainers in problem solving. 

Completing the Science Teacher Academy for the Regions (STAR) series on Teaching Elementary Mathematics through Problem Solving, the teacher trainers from the 15 divisions of the Department of Education National Capital Region underwent a three-day seminar-workshop that improved their skills in teaching through problem solving. 

In partnership with the Philippine Normal University, STAR seeks to capacitate teachers with innovative strategies in teaching science and mathematics in time with the full implementation of the K-12 curriculum. 

DOST-SEI Director Dr. Josette T. Biyo expressed optimism that  the newly energized teachers will boost the quality of science and mathematics education in the region. 

“I believe that, having committed and competent teachers like you, the attainment of quality mathematics education is within our reach. The Science Education Institute of the DOST is with you in this endeavor. We will continue to support and undertake human resources development through science and technology education and training,” she added. 

The training was led by PNU professors Atty. Antonio Ferrer and Edward Macagne, together with Education Specialist Allan Canonigo of the University of the Philippines – National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development.  It included brainstorming on math teaching under the K-12 curriculum and sessions on development and assessment of high-order thinking skills, sample teaching of Grades 1, 3, 4, and 6 lessons, and research lesson development.

The training culminated with teaching demonstrations by the participants and preparation of action plan to echo the training in their respective schools and divisions.

Dr. Leticia Catris, Dean of the PNU College of Teacher Development, emphasized that the development of critical and high-order thinking skills of students should start during their basic education.

“Since we are implementing the new curriculum, it is important to undergo continuous professional development, such as this training, to address the challenges brought about by the curriculum shift,” she added. (30)